Short takes: search for new lines in Word; fix HTML <code> text wrapping in CSS; hidden elements in a WordPress theme

Another mini-blog post under the “short takes” banner…

Search for new lines when reformatting text in Word

Unix admins will probably scoff at me as they can probably cat, awk and sed this (or something like that) but I needed to take a list of values from a web page and convert them to a list in a single command earlier this week. The basic steps I used were:

  1. Copy text from table on HTML page
  2. Paste into Excel
  3. Delete unrequired columns
  4. Save as text

That gave me a file with a list of values (in this case a list of audio or video file formats) but it was one column and I wanted a row to include within some very long PowerShell commands.

  1. Open in Word
  2. Find ^p and replace with ,

The way that this works is that ^p will search for new lines in Word (actually, it’s looking for new paragraphs, and ^l will find a new line). This worked for me in Word, but not in WordPad.

Wrapping text in HTML code snippets

For years (ever since Garry Martin wrote a one of his guest posts on this blog), I’ve been using a WordPress plug-in called DirtyCode to format code snippets that wrap to multiple lines.

The plug-in is no longer maintained though, and WordPress’s visual editor strips out the <dirtycode> tags so I’ve been wanting to fall back to the standard HTML <code> tag. Unfortunately that doesn’t text wrap in my theme, so I had to find a way to stop long lines of code running out of the frame.

The fix (or maybe it’s a fudge – if I could work out how to make custom CSS stick on theme changes, I would) was to edit my WordPress theme’s stylesheet (style.css) to include the following inside the existing code { } line:

word-break: break-all; white-space: pre-wrap;

Hidden elements in a WordPress theme

On a related note, I had some issues with elements not displaying properly in my new theme either. The WordPress forums came to my rescue though – it seems the tag line that I couldn’t see was there but hidden, until I added the following code to the custom CSS:

.site-description { color: #CCCCCC; display: block; }

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