Using the Microsoft Project calendar to block out time when people are not available

I hate Microsoft Project.

I mean, as a tool it’s OK, but it’s idiosyncratic and time-consuming to use; and even copying/pasting information is not as straightforward as it should be. Besides which, far too many people confuse a Gantt Chart with a project plan… and I blame Microsoft Project for that…

When I was at Fujitsu, I avoided having Project on my PC. If I didn’t have a license, I couldn’t edit plans… I could only view them. Unfortunately I can’t get away with that any more and, tonight, I lost most of the evening to some edits that went wrong with tasks getting split across days (I think I changed the working hours to reflect the hours we really work… but that messed something else up).

Anyway, I digress. Something I did find this evening was a really useful article describing how to change the working days for a Microsoft Project calendar. Using this I could not only add bank holidays that were missing in the standard calendar, but add the days that I’m not available to work on the project – for example because of annual leave, or other client commitments – so that the plan couldn’t allocate tasks to me on days I’m not booked to that customer.  You can also edit dates that people are available to work on a project directly (I don’t like referring to people as “resources”) but that doesn’t take into account odd days here and there of non-available time.

Next time though, I’ll leave editing the plan to the Engagement Managers…

The importance of good communications for project success

Once or twice a month, I travel to Manchester for work.  I usually get around by tram (Metrolink) when I’m there – there’s a stop close to our office and its convenient for travel to/from my hotel and the railway station.

Manchester’s tram system is being upgraded at the moment and, last week, I was amused by posters asking passengers to “bear with us whilst we make Victoria posh”:

As much as my southern sensibilities (actually, I’m from the East Midlands) cringe at the idea of “making something posh”, in fairness to Metrolink, they do have a great series of communications around their project (and whoever is responsible clearly has a sense of humour). One of my favourites is reproduced below:

“Dear [customers]
It can be fast.
It can be slow.
You can measure it in feet, inches, weeks, months and years.
And, occasionally, in leaps and bounds.
It’s going to take a little time.
And a lot of hard work.
But, rest assured, it is moving forwards.
Creating something better for us all.
So thank you for your patience.
And while our network is undergoing this transformation, we’ll keep you up-to-date with information.”

I like that poem, and I started to think about other applications for its use… something to consider for my next IT transformation project, perhaps – because good communications are vital to project success (and so many updates that I see are just dull walls of words).

Fixing the Apple iOS SSL bug on a jailbroken iPhone, without upgrading

My iPhone (4S) is jailbroken.  I won’t go into the details of how I did it as it changes with every release but I currently run iOS 7.0.4 and I used the Evasi0n method. Unfortunately, Apple has a pretty shocking bug in that version of iOS which means SSL transactions are not secure.

I didn’t want to go to the hassle of upgrading the OS, then jailbreaking again and, luckily, there is a workaround for fixing the iOS SSL issue on jailbroken iPhones without updating to iOS 7.0.6 (or 6.1.6) – although by the time I get this post written, 7.1 may well have hit the streets…

  1. Launch Cydia
  2. Switch to the Manage page, then select Sources
  3. Add Ryan Petrich’s repo (URL is http://rpetri.ch/repo)
  4. Go back to Manage and select Sources
  5. Search for SSLPatch and install as usual
  6. Restart SpringBoard when prompted

To test the patch (before and after), use the Goto Fail Apple SSL bug test site.